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Education

Resources

With increased education, families can feel more empowered to provide the support and parenting their child needs. There are countless articles and websites with valuable information, below we have listed a few trusted and knowledgeable sources. If you would like further information on any of these topics or have other areas of interest, please contact us — we are happy to help!

Recommended Reading

We have created a reading list full of some of our most commonly referenced books.  They range widely in topic areas, including: attachment, trauma and loss, FASD, and adoption.  There are also recommended readings for children and teens.

Reading List

Adoption

  1. The Adoption Institute conducts and synthesizes research; offers education to inform public opinion; promotes ethical practices and legal reforms; and works to translate policy into action. The Institute improves the lives of people touched by adoption through:

    • Providing the media with a trusted source of information;
    • Encouraging employer support for adoption;
    • Reducing barriers that impede adoption of children who need permanent families;
    • Researching policies and practices that affect adoption;
    • Educating policymakers and the public about the importance of giving adopted people access to information about their origins;
    • Developing a legal framework to ensure access to genetic information and a clear delineation of parental responsibility for children born through reproductive technology;
    • Promoting ethical standards for adoption professionals.

    The institute has numerous publications, presentations, books, conference proceedings, press releases, and testimonies of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute listed by topic.

Brain Development

  1. Brain Basics, the National Institute of Mental Health website, provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders.

  2. Center on the Developing Child has been crafted with the goal of helping to close the gap between what experts know about the science of early childhood and what the public understands and does about it. The Center strives to present information, especially scientific information, in a way that is accessible to a wide range of readers. The Center has a longstanding partnership with the nonprofit FrameWorks Institute, which performs communications research designed to help the Center and its initiatives translate the science of early childhood development accurately and understandably to scientists and non-scientist alike.

  3. ZERO TO THREE is a national, nonprofit organization that informs, trains, and supports professionals, policymakers, and parents in their efforts to improve the lives of infants and toddlers. The site includes information, interactive tools, parent handouts, chats, tip sheets, FAQ's, articles, and PowerPoint slide shows all designed to help you in supporting and nurturing the health and development of babies and toddlers.

Child Welfare

  1. CWLA publishes the Children's Voice magazine, the Child Welfare Journal, Child Welfare Standards of Excellence, and the PRIDE training curriculum, along with hundreds of other books. Their bookstore also carries fight items.

  2. Child Welfare Information Gateway connects child welfare and related professionals to comprehensive information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families. They feature the latest on topics from prevention to permanency, including child abuse and neglect, foster care, and adoption.

Mental Health

  1. Brain Basics, the National Institute of Mental Health website, provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders.

  2. The AACAP developed Facts for Families to provide concise and up-to-date information on issues that affect children, teenagers, and their families. The AACAP provides this important information as a public service and the Facts for Families may be duplicated and distributed free of charge as long as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is properly credited and no profit is gained from their use.

  3. ZERO TO THREE is a national, nonprofit organization that informs, trains, and supports professionals, policymakers, and parents in their efforts to improve the lives of infants and toddlers. The site includes information, interactive tools, parent handouts, chats, Tip Sheets, FAQ's, articles, and PowerPoint slide shows all designed to help you in supporting and nurturing the health and development of babies and toddlers.

  4. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.

Trauma

  1. The Child Trauma Academy (CTA) is a not-for-profit organization based in Houston, Texas working to improve the lives of high-risk children through direct service, research and education. A major activity of the CTA is to translate emerging findings about the human brain and child development into practical implications for the ways we nurture, protect, enrich, educate and heal children. The work of the CTA has resulted in a range of innovative programs in therapeutic, child protection and educational systems.

    Includes numerous articles and resources on the human brain, childhood maltreatment and brain functioning.

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